GRANGE COURT LEOMINSTER

 

SAT CITO SI SAT BENE 

This slogan carved onto the Grange by John Abel can be found in the contemporary French Emblem Books.

A web-search for SAT CITO SI SAT BENE led to a site published by a team at Glasgow University.
http://www.emblems.arts.gla.ac.uk/french/index.php 


The print shown here is by Jean Jacques Boissard (1528-1602).  The background to the proverb  is given in great detail, and there is a link to the facsimile.
http://www.emblems.arts.gla.ac.uk/french/emblem.php?id=FBOb022

© Glasgow University Library.     Project funded by:  Arts and Humanities Research Council.

Two Latin Proverbs on the Grange

AND while you are on the EMBLEM site I recommend you search-box VIVE UT VIVAS, which is also engraved by John Abel on the Grange: and by the same  I.I.BOISSARDI  (  “La Vie De Mémoire”   p41.)   When Norman Reeves explained this,  he chose a devoted recusant interpretation.  The emblem book explains it in two more earthy ways.  So live that you do not wreck your life;  and specifically it says "Esse oportet ut vivas, non vivere ut edas."  =you should eat to live, not live to eat.       And secondly,  spend your life building a memorial to yourself (as Abel truly did): The second quatrain (french Sonnet) roughly goes   
 
    But truly does he live who with foresight, and ardently  
    Aspiring to immortality and the virtues     
   Of hard work, carefulness, and wise counsel  
   Snatches from mortal oblivion a noble name for their own.


Abel: on the Grange(1634): VIVE UT POST VIVAS;  and on his grave at Sarnesfield (1675) VIVE UT VIVAS IN VITAM ÆTERNAM.   

 

A third Latin inscription on the Grange runs:
Vive Deo gratus   toti mundo tumulatus   crimine mundatus    semper transire paratus.

Also found in:   The Mirror of Sinners*. [A loose and abridged translation of the Speculum peccatoris.]        Ms. Univ. Coll. Oxford 97        [p437]
“Viue deo gratus, mundo toto tumulatus, Crimine mundatus, semper transire paratus, that is: 'Lyue thankful to thi god, buried al to the world, Maad al cleene of synne, & reedy euer to goon henne'. Lo nowe, my deere brother, now hast þow i-seye in this myrour what þow schalt sauoure, and what thow schalt vnderstonde.”   

The same words can be seen on the screen at Dore Abbey (restoration 1633/34) where the Arms of Laud, Scudamore and the King are shown.  The words there may have been suggested by Laud.
§ My thanks to Mrs Philippa Spens and to Mrs Ruth E Richardson for checking the Latin at Dore.
    Two sites     http://www.doreabbey.org.uk/theabbey.html  
                        www.blancheparry.com          may well entice you to the Golden Valley.  

 

 

 

 Now, unless you are terrified of Youtube you may enjoy the following.

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vixw5q5vDJY
Tom Harvey's video 

 

 

LIKE COLUMNES DOO VPROP THE FABRICK OF A BVILDING ¤  
SO NOBLE GENTRI DOO SVPPORT THE HONOR OF A KINGDOME 

IN MEMORIA ÆTERNA © ERIT IVSTVS 1633